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AmuseMe
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Veröffentlicht am Tue, Mar 06, 2007 07:54

SOUTHERN WOMEN Southern women appreciate their natural assets: Clean skin. A winning smile. That unforgettable Southern drawl. Southern women know their manners: "Yes, ma'am." "Yes, sir." "Why, no, Billy!" Southern women have a distinct way with fond expressions : "Y'all come back!" "Well, bless your heart." "Drop by when you can." "How's your Momma?" Southern women know their summer weather report: Humidity Humidity Humidity Southern women know their vacation spots: The beach The rivuh The crick Southern women know the joys of June, July, and August: Colorful hi-heel sandals Strapless sundresses Iced sweet tea Southern women know everybody's first name: Honey Darlin' Shugah Southern women know the movies that speak to their hearts: Fried Green Tomatoes Driving Miss Daisy Steel Magnolias Gone With The Wind Southern women know their religions: Baptist Methodist Football Southern women know their country breakfasts: Red-eye gravy Eggs Country ham Mouth-watering homemade biscuits with momma's homemade jelly Southern women know their cities dripping with Southern charm: Chawl'stn S'vanah Foat Wuth N'awlins Addlanna Southern women know their elegant gentlemen: Men in uniform Men in tuxedos Rhett Butler Southern girls know their prime real estate: The Beauty Salon Southern girls know the 3 deadly sins: Having bad hair Having bad manners Cooking bad food More Suthen-ism's: Only a Southerner knows the difference between a hissie fit and a conniption fit, and that you don't "HAVE" them, you "PITCH" them. _____ Only a Southerner knows how many fish, collard greens, turnip greens, peas, beans, etc., make up "a mess." _____ Only a Southerner can show or point out to you the general direction of "yonder." _____ Only a Southerner knows exactly how long "directly" is, as in: "Going to town, be back directly." _____ Even Southern babies know that "Gimme some sugar" is not a request for the white, granular sweet substance that sits in a pretty little bowl in the middle of the table. _____ All Southerners know exactly when "by and by" is. They might not use the term, but they know the concept well. _____ Only a Southerner knows instinctively that the best gesture of solace for a neighbor who's got trouble is a plate of hot fried chicken and a big bowl of cold potato salad. If the neighbor's trouble is a real crisis, they also know to add a large banana puddin! _____ Only Southerners grow up knowing the difference between "right near" and "a right far piece." They also know that "just down the road" can be 1 mile or 20. _____ Only a Southerner, both knows and understands, the difference between a redneck, a good ol' boy, and po' white trash. _____ No true Southerner would ever assume that the car with the flashing turn signal is actually going to make a turn. _____ A Southerner knows that "fixin" can be used as a noun, a verb, or an adverb. _____ Only Southerne rs make friends while standing in lines, ... and when we're "in line," . we talk to everybody! _____ Put 100 Southerners in a room and half of them will discover they're related, even if only by marriage. _____ In the South, y'all is singular, all y'all is plural. _____ Southerners know grits come from corn and how to eat them. _____ Every Southerner knows tomatoes with eggs, bacon, grits, and coffee are perfectly wonderful; that red eye gravy is also a breakfast food; and that fried green tomatoes are not a breakfast food. _____ When you hear someone say, "Well, I caught myself lookin'," you know you are in the presence of a genuine Southerner! _____ Only true Southerners say "sweet tea" and "sweet milk." Sweet tea indicates the need for sugar and lots of it -- we do not like our tea unsweetened. "Sweet milk" means you don't want buttermilk.


In your rocking-chair, by your window dreaming, shall you long, alone. In your rocking-chair, by your window, shall you dream such happiness as you may never feel. –Theodore Dreiser

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butterbll
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Veröffentlicht am Mon, Dec 17, 2007 13:21

Hey Timothy5;An American version of hasty pudding. Grits are A coarsely ground corn mixed with water that is cooked till porridge like consistency.Red eye gravy is: the pan drippings of a fatty Ham steak.first the ham is cooked till done , then the pan is deglazed with either water or strong black coffee a bit of sugar is added to the mix. bring to a boil then slowly add the flour to make a thin gravy. Cajun variations are make with chicory coffee and hot sauce. Ketchup and mustard have been added for a Regional variations.


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bigtom77
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Veröffentlicht am Mon, Dec 17, 2007 11:11

Re: the_dude_abides write: Oh the grease jar! My mom would save bacon grease too -- I have no idea what, if anything, she ever used it for, but that jar was always there, right by the stove.

For those that don't know the grease jar is from another southern tradition-the wasting of nothing- this is one that may never be used but it is not wasted if saved till someone else throws it out. Good post amuse, from the deep south---Tom


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honeybiscuit
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Veröffentlicht am Wed, Aug 15, 2007 17:39

Re:lougenessis write: my momma would on saturdays wash our hair (in the kitchen sink, of course) with castille soap, grease (not with bacon grease!! lol)then plait our hair, let it dry naturally, then press our hair with the hot comb on the kitchen stove. momma still thinks castille soap is the sheeznick! any remembrance of this?

Gives extra meaning to Robert Johson lyrics "You better come on in my kitchen, cause its goin to be rainin outdoors". Henry Louis Gates Jr. harvard prof has a series of essays that talks about the hair and kitchen traditions for African American lives - being a little white girl who wanted to spend more time in the kitchen than anywhere else, and my moma and pop having been active in civil rights organizing - I loved loved being privy to the traditions you speak of - I so wanted to have my hair done like my girl friends and they wanted nothing more than to get out from under their moma or older sister's careful and dilligent hands pulling their hair into neat dews. Never heard of the bacon grease getting used for lotion etc but talk about a pheromones - that undeniable attraction to the smell of bacon makes me think using it that way could be down right dangerous! LOL. Thanks so much for the kithen picture - warms my heart reminding me of the many weekends we spent in each others kitchens as the adults were planning the more mundane logistics of Dr. King's marches. My earliest most joyful memories are of raucuous laughter playing amoungst us kids - and of course we were never aware that we were of different races.


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Veröffentlicht am Tue, Aug 14, 2007 11:28

jjigl, going back to using the bacon grease in the coffee can, my great aunt would spoon out the grease to fry her scrambled eggs in the morning, when she didn't have the actual bacon from the bacon drippings to fry them in. and they were good too. i remembered vaseline being spread on our faces by my mother in the winter to combat that awful ash we people of color get when air hits dry skin. lol another thing, don't know about you, but in the summer time my momma who was a teacher would on saturdays wash our hair (in the kitchen sink, of course) with castille soap, grease (not with bacon grease!! lol)then plait our hair, let it dry naturally, then press our hair with the hot comb on the kitchen stove. momma still thinks castille soap is the sheeznick! any remembrance of this?


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wyldechild
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Veröffentlicht am Mon, Jul 30, 2007 18:16

Now I just have to jump in for one quickie second. I'm an east coast gal and I'd have to say that etiquette, manners and polite behaviour are just as prevalent where I grew up as anywhere else. Now in the Midwest where I live now...that's another story...


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paintbrenda
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Veröffentlicht am Sun, Jul 29, 2007 23:23

I couldn't have said it better. I am from the south and we are move polite than the adverage person. We have manners and are taught to be polite. Most people aren't and are too self centered to be polite and considerate of others

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honeybiscuit
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Veröffentlicht am Fri, Jun 22, 2007 14:47

Re:doubledee2 write: OMG, I laughed so hard when I read your blog. It made me think about my grandmother. My family lived in the city of Atlanta when it was known as "a big small town". My grandmother would make the trip once a week to Rich's and/or Davidson's. But being the proper "Steel Magnolia" she would NEVER go unless she was dressed properly. She ALWAYS wore a dress regardless of whether she was home all day or going out. And glory-be! The fuss she would make if we came to her house in shorts or jeans. When making her trip to "town", my grandmother wore a nice dress with pearls, heels and matching purse, gloves and of course a hat. There was usually a silk hankie tucked neatly into her glove. This was her normal attire up until the late 80's when she died...long after gloves and hats were out of style. On these trips she would have lunch at either Mary Mac?s Tea Room or else at the Varsity. I always wondered about those choices since they are total opposite places to eat. Thanks for the opportunity to make the trip down memory lane! Ya?ll come to see us when you can.

Remember the old Pink Pig at Rich's downtown? I had a pink jacket with a pink pig patch that I was so very proud of. lol. And finale on five - god I miss those sales. My grandmother died just this last Decemeber at 94. Almost to the very end she would change outfits from daytime wear to evening wear daily. This included changing her purse and all assessories. And here she was tooling around in one of those scooters but damn if she didn;t have the perfect gold strappy sandles with the perfect pant suit. The outfit being perfect was by far more important than being able to walk. And one of the very last things she said while waining slowly in the hopsice was to ask for someone to rub Oil of Olay on her face. Once a Southern Lady always huh? Oh yeah her name was Flora - perfect huh? We took her home to Brushy Creek down in South Georgia and the funeral was a truely amazing Southern event - the whole county showed up at the primitive historic country church or as they called it meeting house. She put 5 husbands in the grave and they all absolutley worshiped her. Scarlet O'Hara was pure fiction compared to her.


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doubledee2
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Veröffentlicht am Sun, Jun 10, 2007 21:33

OMG, I laughed so hard when I read your blog. It made me think about my grandmother. My family lived in the city of Atlanta when it was known as "a big small town". My grandmother would make the trip once a week to Rich's and/or Davidson's. But being the proper "Steel Magnolia" she would NEVER go unless she was dressed properly. She ALWAYS wore a dress regardless of whether she was home all day or going out. And glory-be! The fuss she would make if we came to her house in shorts or jeans. When making her trip to "town", my grandmother wore a nice dress with pearls, heels and matching purse, gloves and of course a hat. There was usually a silk hankie tucked neatly into her glove. This was her normal attire up until the late 80's when she died...long after gloves and hats were out of style. On these trips she would have lunch at either Mary Mac?s Tea Room or else at the Varsity. I always wondered about those choices since they are total opposite places to eat. Thanks for the opportunity to make the trip down memory lane! Ya?ll come to see us when you can.


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the_dude_abides
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Veröffentlicht am Sat, Jun 09, 2007 02:51

Oh the grease jar! My mom would save bacon grease too -- I have no idea what, if anything, she ever used it for, but that jar was always there, right by the stove.


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jjiggl
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Veröffentlicht am Fri, Jun 08, 2007 22:03

When I was growing up, we had a grease can, too. It was a used Crisco can that my mother kept on the stove. Whenever she made fried chicken, she poured the used grease in it and reused it a couple of more times before she threw it out. We also had a smaller can in which she poured bacon grease in. She did not reuse that grease for cooking, but we used it as "Vaseline" after our baths. A little bit went a long way, especially on rusty knees and elbows!! I really can't remember how old I was when we stopped using bacon grease and started using lotion as a moisturizer. Probably the same time that we stopped using "Tide" to make a bubble bath. Did anyone else do that when they were growing up??


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bashfulnga
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Veröffentlicht am Wed, Jun 06, 2007 15:26

My mom made this salad but added chopped pecans to it too...YUMMMMM


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AmuseMe
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Veröffentlicht am Fri, Apr 27, 2007 10:42

OMG! My mother STILL uses grease cans! I toss them out when I have the opportunity! lol Growing up, like the rest of you, we had 2. Thank heavens I have no recollection of my mother actually USING that terrifying gelatinous stuff my nightmares were made of! - though I know sure she did! CHUCK!


In your rocking-chair, by your window dreaming, shall you long, alone. In your rocking-chair, by your window, shall you dream such happiness as you may never feel. –Theodore Dreiser

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SweetCarmelBBBW
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Veröffentlicht am Thu, Apr 26, 2007 19:45

Okay Louge, I feel you on that Folger's can. We had a Folger's can for bacon and a Maxwell can for fried chicken and fish. My mother saved the grease and used it to make LYE SOAP. I loved that soap. I swear I had the cleanest skin during my teenage years; but be careful when you washed your face...special care around the eyes. I need her to make some now, I swear you get in your mid-40s and bad skin returns.


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Veröffentlicht am Thu, Apr 26, 2007 11:05

we had a folger's coffee can we placed out bacon grease in and another one for the fried chicken. i never remembered we ever used it, we just placed it in the can to freeze it to throw it away later. i also remembered the sauerkraut and weiners, boy that was some good eats. with cornbread...oooh weee!! i guess up north they used kielbasa or another type of sausage, but weiners did good too at least in our household.


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honeybiscuit
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Veröffentlicht am Wed, Apr 25, 2007 19:35

lol - Amuse, you got a way with wit and words girl. Your talk of bacon fat reminds me - When I was growing up my folks kept near the stove an aluminum tin with a snug fitting top and a red wooden knob and raised lettering that said BACON GREASE on it. All bacon grease was collected in the tin and used the way we use olive oil these days. For literally all sauteed items - we would add other scary fats for deep frying. I recall that the tin was rarely cleaned out (that would be as sinful as washing a seasoned cast iron pan with soap and water) The bacon fat on the bottom may have been a genuine relic. Anyway, a big part of my life over tha last several years has been all about taking care of my eldery parents. I've been slowly but doggedly sorting through and giving way or recyling if possible all the clutter and the lifetime accumulation of STUFF they have managed to pack into the house. BUT recently I found the old bacon grease tin -far back in a corner cabinet. It was all clean (no remnants of bacon grease ghosts thank god) but I have to say it was a nostalgic moment finding that tin. Now I have to find something to do with it - can't possibly get rid of it. LOL


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AmuseMe
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Veröffentlicht am Wed, Apr 25, 2007 13:52

Mmmn.. p.nut butter and banana sandwiches... mmmmmmnnnnnnn. LOL try this one, I'll never forget the day I was served this tasty treat LOL: Brown 1 package of bacon .. set aside Slice into thin rounds and fry in bacon grease 1 package of all meat hot dogs until edges turn .. remove from grease 2 cans of sauerkraut .. fried in remaining bacon grease 1 bag of bugle chips To serve up this dish, on a dinner plate plop on some sauerkraut then crumble in a few strips of bacon then toss on some dog then top with a handful of bugles. .... Or the time I was served a GRAVY SURPRISE that involved fried pigs brains, eggs, a busciut and milk gravy on top to hide it all. Oh, yeah ... southerners got their own way of doing things that's for sure. I'll pass on this one lol Jello salad made with a fruit medly wrecked to bits with whip cream! Who doesn't love a good jello salad?


In your rocking-chair, by your window dreaming, shall you long, alone. In your rocking-chair, by your window, shall you dream such happiness as you may never feel. –Theodore Dreiser

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Veröffentlicht am Wed, Apr 25, 2007 13:26

'men....whooo!!


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SweetCarmelBBBW
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Veröffentlicht am Wed, Apr 25, 2007 12:41

Honey, This is an honest to goodness recipe. My family is from Mississippi, but one of my good friends is from Kentucky and I got this recipe from her. Kentucky Salad 2 packages lime gelatin dessert 2 cups crushed pineapple Pineapple juice and hot water to make 2 cups (very hot) 1 cup cold water 1-1/2 cups grated cucumber 1 teaspoon lemon juice Drain pineapple and cucumber well. Make gelatin dessert according to package recipe. Cool to consistency of egg white. Fold in pineapple, cucumber and lemon juice. Pour into mold and refrigerate. Unmold and serve on crisp lettuce with mayonnaise. So I guess this is an Amen


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honeybiscuit
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Veröffentlicht am Wed, Apr 25, 2007 11:30

So you are going to get sassy with me Johnny? My arn't you just asking for trouble? And until you have had a sweet southern congealed salad that melts in your mouth you might want to withold judgement. In fact I suspect that you would actually like it if served in a good dish. But in all honesty it is one of the more funny quirks of the south. In just about all southern cookbooks up to as late as the late 80's the chapter titled salad really is code for jello with things in it like fruit (usually frozen or canned cherries seem to be a fav), cool whip, coconut, pecans etc. On occassion a particularly scary combination of flavors and textures will be put together in the same way elvis liked grilled peanutbutter, banana and bacon sandwhiches. Yeah we can be an odd bunch. Southern ladies can you back me up on this? Can I get an amen?

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